FOWL POX/COCCIDIOSIS/VENT GLEET


FOWL POX
Fowl pox is a nasty virus that is spread by mosquitoes. It is common worldwide and seems to strike most often in early autumn. Since it is a virus,
there is no cure. It moves slowly through a flock and you have to let it run its course (you can treat symptoms, as with human cold or flu).  There is a
way to prevent pox, with a vaccine. I lost 17 birds to pox in 2006. I now vaccinate every 6 months (there is no lasting immunity, birds need to be re-
vaccinated).  All my birds are vaccinated against pox at 5 weeks old and then at 6 month intervals. I do not vaccinate for anything else.

I strongly suggest vaccination if you live in area with lots of mosquitoes, or where pox is known to occur. I live in Sacramento Valley, they grow lots
of rice around here.  Also most people in Florida routinely vaccinate against pox.  My feed store used to carry pox vaccine but they don’t anymore. I
order from Smith Poultry and Game Bird Supply
www.poultrysupplies.com
or
Jeffers Livestock Supply
http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=2&pf_id=16780

Make sure to order POXINE for birds 6 weeks old and older. Chick-N-Pox is for one day old birds to less than 6 weeks and you will need to re-
vaccinate in 6 weeks if you use Chick-N-Pox. But if you think you have infected birds but they are not showing any symptoms, you may want to
vaccinate using the Chick-N-Pox. It is safer to use with birds that may be infected but show no symptoms.

I order in cooler times of the year and order a couple of vials at a time. I also sometimes mix half the vaccine and save half for next time*. One vial
will vaccinate 1000 birds. The shipping with ice packs costs more than the vaccine itself. Ask them to put in an extra ice pack, tell the you will pay
any additional fees. It needs to stay cold. I store extra vials in the refrigerator. Once mixed you need to use it within and hour or so, or it starts to
lose potency. It will come with a 2-prong stabber. You administer using wing web stab method. It is easier to do with 2 people. I catch all my birds
and put them in a big dog crate. Then mix the vaccine and set in a bowl with crumpled paper towel and an ice pack or two. This keeps it cool and
prevents it from spilling. Remove a bird from the crate, have your assistant hold the bird and extend one wing. Look for the thin part of the upper
wing where there is no muscle, bone or veins (you can see light through it and you can feel it between your thumb and forefinger). Pluck out any
feathers in the area where you will vaccinate. Put the stabber all the way into the bottle of vaccine.  Then using a quick firm motion push the stabber
all the way through the wing web up to the plastic handle (prongs will come out the other side of the wing). Remove stabber, release bird, and repeat
until all are done.  It is quite easy to do.

When you are done, pour any remaining vaccine onto some crumpled newspaper and burn it. It is a live vaccine and can infect wild birds or your birds
if they come in contact with it.  *I rise the bottle that the vaccine was mixed in with alcohol and save it for when I split the next vial and save it for
the next time.

In a week you can check for ‘takes’. You should see a small scab where you vaccinated. I just check a few birds, if all have ‘takes’ I don’t check every
bird.

COCCIDIOSIS TREATMENT USING CORID (AMPROL)
Corid (Amprol) 20% powder
dosage is 1 tsp per gal and needs to be changed daily. Use as only source of water for 5-7 days. If chick is not eating
put food (I use hand rearing formula, found in most pet stores for hand feeding baby birds) in a syringe and draw the Corid mixed water and shake to
get nutrients and then continue to manually hydrate the chick. Corid is a 5 day treatment so do not expect an overnight miracle.

Amprol 9.6% liquid solution dosage is 10cc/ml per gallon of water for 5-7 days. I always feed chicks MEDICATED starter to help prevent this
common and often fatal disease that  primarily afflicts chicks and young birds.

VENT GLEET
I had never seen this nasty condition in my flocks but saw a post from Sally Sunshine and she graciously allowed me to post a link to her article here.


Vent Gleet is characterized by fouling of the feathers with poo, urates and exudate, (mucus) around the vent, and a sometimes an evil, nasty smelling
discharge.  Initially swelling and reddening of the mucosa is seen, progressing to ulceration affecting the vent and continuing a short
distance into the cloaca, this may be covered with a yellow diptheritic membrane, another words, the infection may also cause a red and/or
swollen vent which may bleed. Scarring may result with associated reduction in the elasticity and diameter of the cloaca, which may lead to
problems with egg laying and even, in extreme cases, defecation.  Other general signs of illness often include fluffed feathers, a hunched
appearance, partially closed eyes, the head tucked under a wing, sitting or standing on the ground rather than roost.

Then, a couple of weeks ago I noticed one of my favorite hens had a messy butt.  I cleaned her up and saw her vent was scabby. When I gently
scraped off the scabs, it was a little bloody and her vent was swollen. I thought worms? So I wormed the flocks and everything seemed fine. A few
days ago I noticed she had the messy butt again. It dawned on me, this was VENT GLEET!

Thank you Sally Sunshine for allowing me to post your link.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/vent-gleet-aka-nasty-chicken-butt

TREATMENT of VENT GLEET

FIRST: ISOLATE infected bird to prevent spread of any secondary infections and also to avoid other birds pecking at the red/bloody vent.

NEXT: Soak, Wash and Dietary Changes, Monistat....
1. Soak her bum in warm water and Epsom salts. 10-15 minutes daily for at least 2 days. Clip those nasty butt feathers if necessary
2. Natural Apple Cider Vinegar prevents yeast growth. For drinking water, Add 1.5 Tablespoons to 2 C. water. (My girl won't drink it so I put
about 3/4 TBSP in and she will drink that)
3. Epsom salts: Make sure you have a syringe (local pharmacy or feed store carries them, or ask your vet). Dilute 1 teaspoon of Epsom salt
in 1 ounce of lukewarm water. Wrap the hen in a towel and sit down with her in your lap. Drape a generous fold in front of her to catch the
drips and wipe her beak as needed. Hold the hen so that she is comfortable and her wings are kept at her side. Open the beak with one hand and squirt
the liquid in her throat, a little bit at a time so that she can swallow. Don’t shoot it down her open gullet at full-force, or it could get into
her lungs. Let her close her beak and swallow. Repeat. If some dribbles out, don’t worry. Wear clothes you don’t care about – she’s bound to
shake her head and spray you.

Epsom salt is a naturally occurring mineral, a combination of magnesium and sulfate. It’s soothing on the skin, and so is the choice for soaking
baths if a hen has a dermatological issue. Epsom salt is also used internally. It detoxifies toxins, so if your hen has ingested a dangerous plant,
or consumed botulism, or gotten into a poison, an Epsom salt drench is the cure. It acts as a laxative, so if your hen’s system needs flushing, or
if her crop is impacted or the digestive process seems blocked, this will gently move things along. It also controls yeast infections. It’s a general cure-
all, so if you’re faced with a hen that seems weak in the legs, has a sudden loss of vigor, seems sick without having respiratory symptoms,
Epsom salt might help. It can’t hurt.

4. Diet: Keep giving her the Apple Cider Vinegar water and in addition offer her plain natural yogurt. I mix with a little warm water and syringe into
beak a few times a day
5. I bought Monistat (I bought drugstore brand Miconizole). Get the one for 7 day treatment with 7 disposable applicators (not suppositories). Fill
applicator about 1/2 full. Gently ease into vent (eggs come out of there so the applicator isn't a problem). Inject the cream. Best to do this in the AM
before giving food and wait a bit to feed so she doesn't poop out the meds. Repeat for 7 days. We are on day 3 of treatment and she looks much
better but I am going to keep her confirmed for 7 days. (She's really mad about that!)

DO NOT USE ANTIBIOTICS. THEY WILL KILL ALL THE GOOD BACTERIA YOU ARE TRYING TO INTRODUCE

You should see improvement in about 3 days but continue to treat for a week to make sure she is completely recovered.
HOME

                          FOWL POX/COCCIDIOSIS/VENT GLEET


FOWL POX
Fowl pox is a nasty virus that is spread by mosquitoes. It is common worldwide and seems to strike most often in early autumn. Since it is a virus,
there is no cure. It moves slowly through a flock and you have to let it run its course (you can treat symptoms, as with human cold or flu).  There is a
way to prevent pox, with a vaccine. I lost 17 birds to pox in 2006. I now vaccinate every 6 months (there is no lasting immunity, birds need to be re-
vaccinated).  All my birds are vaccinated against pox at 5 weeks old and then at 6 month intervals. I do not vaccinate for anything else.

I strongly suggest vaccination if you live in area with lots of mosquitoes, or where pox is known to occur. I live in Sacramento Valley, they grow lots
of rice around here.  Also most people in Florida routinely vaccinate against pox.  My feed store used to carry pox vaccine but they don’t anymore. I
order from Smith Poultry and Game Bird Supply
www.poultrysupplies.com
or
Jeffers Livestock Supply
http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=2&pf_id=16780

Make sure to order POXINE for birds 6 weeks old and older. Chick-N-Pox is for one day old birds to less than 6 weeks and you will need to re-
vaccinate in 6 weeks if you use Chick-N-Pox. But if you think you have infected birds but they are not showing any symptoms, you may want to
vaccinate using the Chick-N-Pox. It is safer to use with birds that may be infected but show no symptoms.

I order in cooler times of the year and order a couple of vials at a time. I also sometimes mix half the vaccine and save half for next time*. One vial
will vaccinate 1000 birds. The shipping with ice packs costs more than the vaccine itself. Ask them to put in an extra ice pack, tell the you will pay
any additional fees. It needs to stay cold. I store extra vials in the refrigerator. Once mixed you need to use it within and hour or so, or it starts to
lose potency. It will come with a 2-prong stabber. You administer using wing web stab method. It is easier to do with 2 people. I catch all my birds
and put them in a big dog crate. Then mix the vaccine and set in a bowl with crumpled paper towel and an ice pack or two. This keeps it cool and
prevents it from spilling. Remove a bird from the crate, have your assistant hold the bird and extend one wing. Look for the thin part of the upper
wing where there is no muscle, bone or veins (you can see light through it and you can feel it between your thumb and forefinger). Pluck out any
feathers in the area where you will vaccinate. Put the stabber all the way into the bottle of vaccine.  Then using a quick firm motion push the stabber
all the way through the wing web up to the plastic handle (prongs will come out the other side of the wing). Remove stabber, release bird, and repeat
until all are done.  It is quite easy to do.

When you are done, pour any remaining vaccine onto some crumpled newspaper and burn it. It is a live vaccine and can infect wild birds or your birds
if they come in contact with it.  *I rise the bottle that the vaccine was mixed in with alcohol and save it for when I split the next vial and save it for
the next time.

In a week you can check for ‘takes’. You should see a small scab where you vaccinated. I just check a few birds, if all have ‘takes’ I don’t check every
bird.

COCCIDIOSIS TREATMENT USING CORID (AMPROL)
Corid (Amprol) 20% powder
dosage is 1 tsp per gal and needs to be changed daily. Use as only source of water for 5-7 days. If chick is not eating
put food (I use hand rearing formula, found in most pet stores for hand feeding baby birds) in a syringe and draw the Corid mixed water and shake to
get nutrients and then continue to manually hydrate the chick. Corid is a 5 day treatment so do not expect an overnight miracle.

Amprol 9.6% liquid solution dosage is 10cc/ml per gallon of water for 5-7 days. I always feed chicks MEDICATED starter to help prevent this
common and often fatal disease that  primarily afflicts chicks and young birds.

VENT GLEET
I had never seen this nasty condition in my flocks but saw a post from Sally Sunshine and she graciously allowed me to post a link to her article here.
Thank you Sally!

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/vent-gleet-aka-nasty-chicken-butt

Vent Gleet is characterized by fouling of the feathers with poo, urates and exudate, (mucus) around the vent, and a sometimes an evil, nasty smelling
discharge.  Initially swelling and reddening of the mucosa is seen, progressing to ulceration affecting the vent and continuing a short
distance into the cloaca, this may be covered with a yellow diptheritic membrane, another words, the infection may also cause a red and/or
swollen vent which may bleed. Scarring may result with associated reduction in the elasticity and diameter of the cloaca, which may lead to
problems with egg laying and even, in extreme cases, defecation.  Other general signs of illness often include fluffed feathers, a hunched
appearance, partially closed eyes, the head tucked under a wing, sitting or standing on the ground rather than roost.

Then, a couple of weeks ago I noticed one of my favorite hens had a messy butt.  I cleaned her up and saw her vent was scabby. When I gently
scraped off the scabs, it was a little bloody and her vent was swollen. I thought worms? So I wormed the flocks and everything seemed fine. A few
days ago I noticed she had the messy butt again. It dawned on me, this was VENT GLEET!

TREATMENT of VENT GLEET

FIRST: ISOLATE infected bird to prevent spread of any secondary infections and also to avoid other birds pecking at the red/bloody vent.

NEXT: Soak, Wash and Dietary Changes, Monistat....
1. Soak her bum in warm water and Epsom salts. 10-15 minutes daily for at least 2 days. Clip those nasty butt feathers if necessary
2. Natural Apple Cider Vinegar prevents yeast growth. For drinking water, Add 1.5 Tablespoons to 2 C. water. (My girl won't drink it so I put
about 3/4 TBSP in and she will drink that)
3. Epsom salts: Make sure you have a syringe (local pharmacy or feed store carries them, or ask your vet). Dilute 1 teaspoon of Epsom salt
in 1 ounce of lukewarm water. Wrap the hen in a towel and sit down with her in your lap. Drape a generous fold in front of her to catch the
drips and wipe her beak as needed. Hold the hen so that she is comfortable and her wings are kept at her side. Open the beak with one hand and squirt
the liquid in her throat, a little bit at a time so that she can swallow. Don’t shoot it down her open gullet at full-force, or it could get into
her lungs. Let her close her beak and swallow. Repeat. If some dribbles out, don’t worry. Wear clothes you don’t care about – she’s bound to
shake her head and spray you.

Epsom salt is a naturally occurring mineral, a combination of magnesium and sulfate. It’s soothing on the skin, and so is the choice for soaking
baths if a hen has a dermatological issue. Epsom salt is also used internally. It detoxifies toxins, so if your hen has ingested a dangerous plant,
or consumed botulism, or gotten into a poison, an Epsom salt drench is the cure. It acts as a laxative, so if your hen’s system needs flushing, or
if her crop is impacted or the digestive process seems blocked, this will gently move things along. It also controls yeast infections. It’s a general cure-
all, so if you’re faced with a hen that seems weak in the legs, has a sudden loss of vigor, seems sick without having respiratory symptoms,
Epsom salt might help. It can’t hurt.

4. Diet: Keep giving her the Apple Cider Vinegar water and in addition offer her plain natural yogurt. I mix with a little warm water and syringe into
beak a few times a day
5. I bought Monistat (I bought drugstore brand Miconizole). Get the one for 7 day treatment with 7 disposable applicators (not suppositories). Fill
applicator about 1/2 full. Gently ease into vent (eggs come out of there so the applicator isn't a problem). Inject the cream. Best to do this in the AM
before giving food and wait a bit to feed so she doesn't poop out the meds. Repeat for 7 days. We are on day 3 of treatment and she looks much
better but I am going to keep her confirmed for 7 days. (She's really mad about that!)

DO NOT USE ANTIBIOTICS. THEY WILL KILL ALL THE GOOD BACTERIA YOU ARE TRYING TO INTRODUCE

You should see improvement in about 3 days but continue to treat for a week to make sure she is completely recovered.